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The First Pig To Ever Fly Was Recorded In History Over 100 Years Ago

This pig really nailed it!

“Pigs can’t fly” is a figure of speech that suggests complete impossibility. Logic, science, and nature dictate that pigs can’t fly and will never be able to fly on their own.

This did not stop J.T.C. Moore-Brabazon from helping his pig achieve the impossible. On November 4, 1909, Brabazon flew his French-built Voisin private aeroplane carrying his pig aloft.

Brabazon placed his pig inside a wicker basket, which was strapped to the wing strut of the plane.

Source: Imgur

A hand-written sign was attached to the basket announcing to the world, “I am the first pig to fly.” Brabazon purposely brought along his pig to the flight to disprove the famous saying that pigs cannot fly. This historic flight took place on British soil at Leysdown-on-Sea, a beachfront community on the eastern Isle of Sheppey in the Borough of Swale in Kent, England.

Brabazon’s journey to learning how to fly is an amazing one.

Source: Imgur

He first learned how to fly in France. While there, Brabazon purchased the standard model Voisin aeroplane, which he brought back to England in 1909. When he arrived in England, he was able to secure the second pilot’s license ever issued to a British subject on March 8, 1909.

The first ever license was issued to Henry Farman, a notable British pilot, builder, and designer.

On May 1909, Brabazon made a 500-yard flight on the Voisin, which became recognized as the first flight by a British pilot in Britain.

Source: Imgur

After assuring the operability of the Voisin, Brabazon made some early flying records, which included his ambition and the iconic flight with his pig.

Although the pig flight did not really add any value to aviation developments during the time, the amusement and entertainment of breaking a long-standing statement that “pigs can’t fly” is well worth it.

History

Mysterious Concrete Arrows With No Definite Historical Background Found In America

Will these concrete arrows unlock discoveries to the past?

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Odd concrete arrows have been reported all over the United States and they have left travelers and history buffs wondering about what these arrows mean. These gigantic arrows were seen sitting around the desert of American Southwest.

The length of the arrows are up to 70-foot in diameter. Each one is found in an isolated area, which obviously served a purpose in the past.

Understanding what these signs are has been an adventure for many history enthusiasts.

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History

The Surprising History Of The Peace Symbol

It’s more than just a sign for hippies in the 1960s!

It is one of the most recognizable symbols in the world yet only a few are aware of how the peace symbol came to be. The sign, which consists of a circle and three lines, has been connected to hippies and the Summer of Love back in the 1960s. However, its origin comes from a darker side of history.

Gerald Holtom had created the design for a specific event in 1958. The artist and pacifist introduced the symbol in signs and banners carried by people who were protesting nuclear weapons at Aldermaston in London. It was a simple design that was immediately adopted by the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND). The symbol borrowed its design from the semaphore alphabet which is used by sailors to communicate with flags.

Holtom's symbol combines the letters "N" and "D" for "nuclear disarmament."

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History

Researchers Identify Chile’s Own Stonehenge in the Atacama Desert

The cairn-like pillars called saywas and the Stonehenge have similar purposes.

In the Atacama desert close to the ancient pathways of the Qhapaq Ñan, an Inca road network that stretches from southern Colombia to central Chile, the mysterious saywas can be found. These cairn-like pillars mark different spots in the desert and have been a mystery to many for centuries.

Experts have wondered what their real purpose was. They were in the middle of the desert and didn't make sense as milestones and signposts. Dr. Cecilia Sanhueza of Chile’s Pre-Columbian Art Museum, who has been studying the saywas for some 20 years, thought there must be another function for the mesmerizing stonework.

A monumental research project has brought together experts different disciplines - from archaeologists to historians and astronomers - to help solve the 500-year-old mystery of the saywas.

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