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Earth is Sucking More Water In Its Interior Than Previously Thought, Scientists Discover

We’re talking about TRILLIONS of tons of water here.

In a research recently published in the Nature journal, we learn that our planet has been swallowing trillions of tons of water into its interior because of tectonic plates collision beneath the ocean. The researchers collected information about the rumblings over a year’s period and they were able to collect 19 passive seismographs across the Mariana Trench.

Additionally, they likewise gathered data “from seven island-based seismographs,” the Daily Mail reported, which allowed them to have “a more detailed picture of how the Pacific plate bends into the trench, revealing new insight on how the rocks hold onto water deep beneath the surface.”

Source: Pexels

As National Science Foundation’s Division of Ocean Sciences program director Candace Major said:

“This research shows that subduction zones move far more water into Earth’s deep interior – many miles below the surface – than previously thought. The results highlight the important role of subduction zones in Earth’s water cycle.”

The team said that the extreme pressure and temperature conditions led to the water getting trapped in the rock as the plate goes down into the crust and upper mantle.

Doug Wiens, the Robert S. Brookings Distinguished Professor in Earth and Planetary Sciences in Arts & Sciences, added:

“Previous estimates vary widely in the amount of water that is subducted deeper than 60 miles.

“The main source of uncertainty in these calculations was the initial water content of the subducting uppermost mantle.”

Source: Wikipedia

The additional data gathered from the seismic images are telling us that previously-known information weren’t accurate. Besides, the researchers discovered that about 4 times of water is sucked into the interior.

“Previous conventions were based on active source studies, which can only show the top 3-4 miles into the incoming plate,” explained Cai. “They could not be very precise about how thick it is, or how hydrated it is. Our study tried to constrain that. If water can penetrate deeper into the plate, it can stay there and be brought down to deeper depths.”

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First Image From The Surface Of Mars Revealed After NASA’s InSight Successfully Landed

Wow.

It has been a long curiosity as to what Mars actually looks like. Images of the planet from afar have been shared to the public multiple times, but nobody really knows what the surface of the Red Planet really looks like until now.

NASA has successfully landed a probe on the surface of Mars. After a nearly seven-month journey and gripping landing sequence, NASA’s InSight lander has already returned its first image of the Martian surface.

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China Creates Artificial Sun That Is Hotter Than The Real One

Wow.

China has built an “artificial sun” that reaches temperature six times that of the core of our closest star. The state-of-the-art reactor is designed to replicate the processes of the sun as part of a project to turn hydrogen into cost-effective green energy.

China’s “artificial sun” has reached a temperature of 180 million ºF (100 million C) with a heating power of 10 megawatts, according to scientists at the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Plasma Physics, where the experiment was conducted. The device called the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) is built to harness the energy of nuclear fusion, the same process that powers stars.

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No, Not All of Earth’s Water Came From Asteroids, According To New Research

The belief that water came from asteroids is a “blind spot,” according to these experts.

Contrary to what most scientists would tell you, it looks like not all of our planet's water came from asteroid matetials after all. One recent research in the United States is now challenging that, claiming our science books may have not been entirely accurate all along.

It has always been believed that Earth's water came from asteroids since it was discovered that ocean and asteroidal samples contain similar ratio of deuterium to normal hydrogen. We've mostly been taught this "fact" in school but those science textbooks may have to be rewritten soon enough.

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