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Children Today Have Better Self-Control Than Those From the 80s, Study Says

Does generation have anything to do with it?

These days, social experiments, especially those on children, have become quite the norm. As the most famous of them, it is almost impossible not to see the revival of the decades-old marshmallow test.

This experiment may be torturous for some, but it has produced the cutest videos that amused thousands. It also means an indication of strong willpower – a promising signal of future success.

The marshmallow test is one of the most famous social science experiments.

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Imagine: Put a piece of marshmallow in front of a child. Tell him that he can have a second one if he can go 15 minutes without eating the first one, and then leave the room. It doesn’t have to be a marshmallow. It could be a pretzel or a cookie, but the conditions of the Catch 22 is always the same.

Just recently, a study conducted by psychologist Stephanie M. Carlson from the University of Minnesota called for a repeat of the marshmallow test. In her study, she asked adults how they believed children of today would fare in the marshmallow test. Over 70 percent said the children of today wouldn’t be able to wait as long as kids 50–60 years ago did.

Three-quarters of those 350 who joined the survey blatantly said today's children would have less self-control.

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To test her results, Carlson together with her colleagues and psychologist Walter Mischel reviewed the results of the marshmallow tests. They checked and compared the children’s results from the original test with those conducted in the 1980s and early 2000s.

To the surprise of the adults polled, the children who took part in the experiment in 2000s actually waited.

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The researchers noted an average of two minutes longer resistance than those in the 1960s, and 1 minute longer than those tested in the 1980s.

While this result does not debunk questions about whether it is indeed affluence or willpower that shapes these children’s resistance, “this finding stands in stark contrast with the assumption by adults that today’s children have less self-control than previous generations,” says Carlson.

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To End Malaria, Bill Gates Donates $4 Million To Create Mosquitoes That Destroy Each Other

It sounds like a strange idea but the tech mogul is absolutely serious.

Bill Gates of Microsoft recently made headlines after declaring that he will be donating about US$ 4,000,000 to fund a project that will hopefully put a permanent stop at malaria for good. According to the news, Gates is aiming to create killer mosquitoes that destroy each other through the insects’ mating time.

It sounds like a strange idea but the tech mogul is absolutely serious. In fact, he is using money from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and he hopes to eliminate the deadly disease “within a generation.”

Bill Gates plans to create genetically-modified male mosquitoes that will mate with female mosquitoes.

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July 27 Blood Moon Predicted As Longest In The 21st Century— And Will Mark Doomsday?

The upcoming blood moon has everyone talking and it’s not just because it’s the longest total lunar eclipse in 100 years.

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The moon will turn red on July 27 and 28 in this year’s second total lunar eclipse. While it may not be as rare as the “super blue blood moon” in January, it has its own special characteristics that caused news about it to go viral online.

One month from today, the Earth’s natural satellite is expected to undergo a total eclipse. But that’s not the best part yet.

The rare super blue blood moon in January became a spectacle, but the July lunar eclipse will steal the show

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Dirty Diaper Recycling Is Now A Thing, Thanks To This Taiwan-Made Machine

This machine transforms dirty diapers into clean, usable materials. Plus it helps get rid at least 5% of the world’s waste!

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Diapers comprise a huge chunk of the world’s waste. Parents in the United States and Australia use as much as 27.4 billion and 5.6 billion nappies are used per day, respectively. Add those numbers to the fact that the material takes 400 years to decompose and we’ll have mountains of dirty diapers all over the world.

With this in mind, experts have been working day and night to find a way to reduce such waste including innovating traditional nappies into cloth diapers. Still, the tempting ease and convenience of disposable diapers seem to leave busy parents conflicted about needing to wash reusable diapers every single time.

Fortunately, a group of researchers from Taiwan’s Chung Hua University was able to come up with a viable solution....

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